Lady of the Arts: A Profile of Tere Paniagua

by Maximilian Eyle

La Casita Cultural Center and Punto de Contacto (Point of Contact) are two of the foremost Latino cultural institutions in Syracuse. Point of Contact is celebrating its 42nd year of showcasing Latin American contemporary art and literature, while the newer La Casita has blossomed into an active community center that provides educational opportunities, historical awareness, and cultural exhibitions. A peek behind the curtain of each reveals the tireless work of Tere Paniagua, Executive Director of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community at Syracuse University – an educator of Puerto Rican descent who has been a driving force in Syracuse’s art and culture community for over 15 years.

Tere is a slender, energetic woman with long silver hair and an ever-present smile. Before coming to Syracuse, Tere spent over 20 years working as a journalist profiling artists and literary figures in Puerto Rico and Los Angeles. She earned her degree from Syracuse University, Class of ‘82 and developed a strong connection to the city where she has now raised three children. In 2002 she started work at SU’s Latino and Latin American Studies program (LLAS) and the Department of Languages, where she began teaching and designed her own course in Spanish titled Hispanic Journalistic Practices. One of her colleagues was Point of Contact founder, Pedro Cuperman. She began helping him out and working with him during her extra time and soon fell in love with the gallery’s projects.

Today she is Point of Contact’s Executive Director, working to further the gallery’s role as a platform for showcasing visual artists and literary figures from Latin America. “People often have a preconceived notion of what Latin American art is,” Tere explains, “Point of Contact allows us to break many of those stereotypes.” One of the most important things that the gallery does is shine light on new artists, drawing attention to emerging voices in the arts community. Currently, Point of Contact is working with Abisay Puentes to plan a show for next year. The Cuban-born painter is known for his dual approach of presenting his visual work with a corresponding orchestral soundtrack.

Tere’s second project, La Casita, opened in 2011 with a distinct mission: to focus on the local community, to work with Syracuse youth, and to provide educational programs that integrate with the life of the community. La Casita presents opportunities for students that have a special interest in Syracuse’s Latino community to work as volunteers, mentors, and instructors. They exhibit visual arts, music, and dance – including monthly Argentine tango events. Tere says the goal is to choose “exhibitions that document the traditions and the life of this community.” Exhibits often include historic photos, memorabilia, and other artifacts that tell family histories among Latinos in Syracuse.

There is also an archival element to the work of La Casita. In 2017, they featured a beautiful collection of traditional musical instruments from Caribbean cultures that examines the history of that musical heritage. Before that, there was an exhibition telling the stories of Latino veterans and documenting the experiences of local and campus Latino families who had members in the military, with interviews exploring their experiences. Two years ago, La Casita entered into a partnership with the Smithsonian Institution to engage in a project that would showcase community collections. The theme of the project is “Latinos in Baseball”, presenting a view of Latino baseball culture “from the barrios to the big leagues.” The Smithsonian project now includes nearly 2 dozen partner galleries and cultural centers across the nation and will culminate in an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. in 2020 before becoming a traveling show.

“The scope of these projects would not be possible without the help and support of Syracuse University and the College of Arts & Sciences,” Tere explains. But the benefits are not one sided. While the community is nourished by the many cultural resources provided by La Casita and Point of Contact, the University is rewarded with a wealth of opportunities for student involvement, experiential learning and career advancement. Speaking to the future of Latinos in Syracuse, Tere reinforces the importance of these cultural institutions. “We ought to feel very proud of this community,” Tere says, “It is essential that we expose our youth, our students to our proud history, to our rich traditions, and to the art of our people.”

The Point of Contact Gallery is located at The Warehouse Building, 350 W Fayette St, Syracuse, NY 13202

La Casita Cultural Center is located at 109 Otisco St, Syracuse, NY 13204

Maximilian Eyle is a native of Syracuse, NY and a graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He works as a media consultant and writes each month about a variety of issues for Spanish-language papers across New York State. Maximilian has a love of Hispanic culture and learned Spanish while living in Spain where he studied and worked as an English teacher. He can be contacted at maxeyle@gmail.com.

Here we go again…

Here we go again… this time is… fourteen…!!!
by Hugo Acosta

Here we go again, usually during the last week of (each) January, when I take a few minutes to reflect, to contemplate, to think about it, and… to prepare content for these annual editorials… something that this time will be shorter and quick… something that almost was not done, but (thanks to my editor in chief, Marisol Hernandez) it happened…

So, to keep that “short and quick approach, I am not going to narrate again, the continuing straggle and still-growing difficulty of the newspaper business, I am not going to develop on the “ups and downs” we might have gone through this year, and yes, I am not going to expose much of the possible professional (or personal) issues I might have gone through this year, and I am not going to present some peculiar weird analogy of the number 14 (like I have done in past anniversary times).

This time, I am going to simply indicate that one more time, this anniversary moment commemoration, still makes me feel the sense and emotion of accomplishment, and the strong gratification of achievement, for something that I like to do, and that I still do with love. Producing this ethnic publication (and the other Hispanic Media Outlets we provide) keeps giving me not only the financial support for me and my family, but also an enjoyment and delight to serve my culture. I do apologize if this drier and shorter editorial might have disappointed some (maybe even my editor in chief, Marisol Hernandez), and I apologize if the expected drama and fuss is not there like in the past, but in addition of going through a really busy and hectic time in this beginning of the year, some other (personal) issues might have somehow tinted or affected the inspiration and motivation I usually get, to prepare and develop a better editorial.

I still want to thank the ones that not only helped us and supported us in the making and existence of this 14-year old project (specially clients, associates, and staff), but I also want to thank to those that believe (and are still believing) in this product, and in my culture, and believe in the efforts that Marisol & I have been putting for the last 14 years… and planning to continue doing for… many more years in the future.

HEALTH

Eating Disorder

by Ria Pal

For most Americans, the typical patient with an eating disorder is a thin, wealthy Caucasian female. In reality, there is a tremendous range of patients, and this stereotype causes families and medical providers alike to overlook symptoms and treatment for a potentially devastating disease with psychological and physiological consequences.

Information about the prevalence of eating disorders in ethnic minority groups, particularly Latinos, is virtually unknown — several studies on eating disorders have left out Latinos as a group entirely. Yet, several studies have reported higher rates of eating disorder symptoms and body dissatisfaction among Latino groups than among non-Hispanic whites or among other ethnic minority females. For example, studies have reported a higher and more severe prevalence of binge eating among Latino females compared to White, African American, and Asian American women. Population-based surveys of adolescents found that rates of dieting and using laxatives were highest among Latinas. Studies of body image found that unlike some other ethnic groups, who idealize very thin bodies, Latinos often idealize bodies that are simultaneously thin and curvy.

The most common eating disorders are anorexia (avoiding eating altogether) and bulimia (overeating and then “purging” to get rid of the food through forced vomiting or laxative use). Among Latinos, however, the most common diagnosis is called OSFED, “Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder.” OSFED is equally serious, but does not fit into a definition as easily. Behaviors that would be categorized as OSFED include binge-eating, excessive eating at night, and purging without overeating.

Regardless of age, gender, weight, or immigration status, people who think they may have unhealthy eating behaviors deserve help. Beyond the initial challenges of recognizing the symptoms and breaking the stigma, affording eating disorder treatment is hard. But there are alternatives to pocket-draining residential treatment programs that average at $30,000 a month. Often just an inquiry and application away, some treatment facilities do offer scholarships and grants. Teaching hospitals or mental health facilities, which often offer free services, might also be an option. Then there are support groups, online and offline, which exist to both help guide people in their search for assistance and act as an inexpensive and effective way to talk and help one another deal with the variety of concerns and challenges that come with disordered eating.

It can be helpful to think of eating disorders as a chronic disease, one that may become better but is at a risk for relapse. It is important for people to take precautions against relapsing, especially when they are doing better. People with eating disorders can benefit from a wide range of options for help, which include support groups (which can be found at http://www.anad.org/get-help/find-support-groups-treatment/), therapists, dieticians, treatment centers, dentists, physicians, psychiatrists, and art or yoga therapists.

Another harmful aspect of the stereotype that eating disorders affect only white people is that few resources have been developed for Spanish speaking patients. It can be difficult and intimidating to seek out resources in Spanish, especially in rural areas. https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/neda-espanol is a web site with basic information and a confidential, toll free hotline (1-800-931-2237). Not all of the volunteers on the hotline are Spanish speaking, but if someone who only speaks Spanish calls, they can still be assisted. If you or someone you know may have an eating disorder, take the first step to seek help.

Ria Pal is a medical student and aspiring pediatrician at the University of Rochester. She hopes to work in community health as an advocate for Spanish speaking patients. She is on the board of the school’s chapter of the Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) who are committed to contribute educational articles relevant to the Latino community.

CONGRATULATION Ria Pal on your graduation from the Rochester University. CNY Latino wishes you success in your medical career and we THANK YOU for your contribution to our bilingual publication…

The shutdown, trump’s proposal, now what?

by José Enrique Perez

We all know that the federal government shut down for 3 days last month. Now, this month the government is in risk of shutting down again. DACA, the Dreamers, immigrants, were at the heart of the shutdown. They will be again.

In response to the shutdown, the President Trump presented (finally) his immigration plan. He supports a 10- to 12-year path to citizenship for not just the roughly 700,000 enrolled in the expiring DACA program but for other “DACA-eligible illegal immigrants” who are in the U.S. illegally and were brought to the country as children. The White House estimates that could cover up to 1.8 million people.

In exchange, the White House wants an immigration measure to include $25 billion for a border wall. However, based on the language of the proposal for the wall, it does not seem it is the coast-to-coast physical structure on the Southern border that Trump promised at campaign rallies, but, it “takes a combination of physical infrastructure, technology, personnel, and resources.”

Trump also wants changes to the legal immigration system, including policies that prioritize family members “to spouses and minor children only.” Finally, Trump wants to completely eliminate the visa lottery system, which the memo says “is riddled with fraud and abuse and does not serve the national interest.”

Immigrants and civil rights groups are shocked with this proposal. First of all, the DACA and Dreamers deserve a clean Dream Act not tied to any border enforcement or to be hostage in exchange of the elimination of family based immigration.

Starting with the wall and border security, all the experts agree (Except for Trump and his right wing allies) that expanding the border wall makes no sense, will harm the environment, and is counter to the desires of actual border communities. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has met and exceeded all previous “benchmarks for border security” proposed in bipartisan draft immigration legislation. According to DHS’s own reporting, it is more difficult to cross the southern border without authorization today than it has ever been before, with undocumented entries at their lowest since the early 1970s. Since DHS’s inception in 2003, its Customs and Border Protection (CBP) budget has more than doubled and its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) spending has grown 85%. The number of agents has ballooned. CBP and ICE’s budget is already 24% larger than the Federal Bureau of Investigation; Drug Enforcement Administration; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; Secret Service; and U.S. Marshals combined.

It is proven that Family-based immigration leads to successful, strong American families. Adult children, brothers, and sisters, help run small businesses, help each other as they integrate into America, and support each other’s child care needs. One reason our family-based immigration system has been so successful is that extended family members in the U.S. to help immigrants settle, find jobs and housing and integrate and become successful Americans. Under the so-called merit-based plan, many of us would not be here today, except African Americans and Native Americans, our ancestors came to the U.S. with little money, struggling for a better life.

The termination of the Diversity Visa Lottery Program, which is a small program that allows 50,000 individuals from countries with historically low rates of immigration to come to the United States each year. Winners of the lottery go through the same intensive screening that all aspiring immigrants to the United States face. The lottery brings a small number of immigrants to the United States, but serves a critical goal of contributing to the rich diversity that keeps the United States vibrant.

These realities lead us to one conclusion: Trump’s proposal must be rejected by Congress and the Senate and a new deal MUST be reached; otherwise, the federal government will shut down again on February 8, 2018.

You should remember that this article is not intended to provide you with legal advice; it is intended only to provide guidance about the current immigration issues and other immigration policies.

I represent individuals in immigration cases. If you have any questions or concerns about an immigration case, you can call me at (315) 422-5673, send me a fax at (315) 466-5673, or e-mail me at joseperez@joseperezyourlawyer.com. The Law Office of Jose Perez is located at 120 East Washington Street, Suite 925, Syracuse, New York 13202. Now with offices in Buffalo and Rochester!!! Please look for my next article in the March edition.

Heart on Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most ethnicities in the United States. Being overweight or obese puts you at risk for many forms of heart disease. February is American Heart Month! It is a great time to take control of your weight and waist line to promote heart health.

There are many factors to consider if you are trying to lose, maintain or gain weight. Factors that influence the number of calories you need are age, height, gender and your activity level. It is important to balance calories in with calories out! When we eat more than we need our bodies store the extra calories as fat. Balance the foods you eat with the activities you do. Try to be active for 30 minutes on most days of the week.

Use these tips to stay active, eat healthy and feel your best!

• Make little changes! Try just 10 minutes of activity at a time. Take a brisk walk, pass a soccer ball, or do some push-ups. Exercising doesn’t have to be stressful. Have Fun! Do activities that you enjoy. Dance, play basketball at the gym, go sledding, or walk the mall with friends.
• Move throughout the day! Park the car further away, take the stairs, walk to a different bus stop or do yoga stretches while you watch TV! It all adds up!
• Be an active family! Get the whole family moving. Kids need at least 60 minutes of activity every day. Play catch with your kids, visit the park or go for a family bike ride. Remember, you are their greatest role model!
• Limit Screen Time! The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends limiting screen to 2 hours or less each day. This includes: TV watching; playing video games and watching movies.
• Make healthy choices! Choose whole grains like brown rice, whole wheat pasta and whole grain breads. Whole grains keep us full longer and give us the energy to be active! Drink water, low-fat milk or seltzer with a splash of 100% juice! Limit soda and juices. Soda and sugar-sweetened beverages have added sugars that can slow us down and cause weight gain.
• Balance Your Portions! Pay attention to how much food is on your plate! Taking too much food can cause us to eat more than our bodies need. Use smaller plates, cups and bowls. Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables first, then add meat and grains. Listen to your body! Notice body cues letting you know when you’re full or hungry.
• Eat slowly! Wait it out! It takes twenty minutes for your mind to realize you’re full after eating.
• Track your progress! Super tracker is a free online tool where you can get a nutrition and physical activity plan. You can also set a goal and track your food, activities and weight. Visit, www.ChooseMyPlate.gov., for tips to help you make healthier choices and plan ahead.

Tortilla Roll-Ups- Makes 12 servings; ½ tortilla= 1 servings

6 large whole wheat flour tortillas

Ingredients:
6 large whole wheat flour tortillas
1 Cup grated low fat cheddar cheese (4 oz.)
1 Cup mild salsa (8 oz.)
1 Cup black beans, drained (½ can)
1 avocado, mashed (optional)

Instructions:
1. Put the tortillas on a plate, cover with a paper towel, and microwave on High for 1 minute (optional).
2. Mix cheese, salsa, and black beans.
3. Spread a thin layer of mixture on each tortilla.
4. Top with a spoonful of avocado (optional).
5. Roll up, cut in half, and serve.

Yield: About 12 servings (½ tortilla each)

Nutrition information: Calories- 140, Total Fat- 4.5 g.,
Sodium-290 mg., Carbohydrates: 17 g, Fiber- 3 g., Sugar- 1 g.,
Protein- 6 g.

Source: Choose Health: Food, Fun, and Fitness, Cornell University 2015, recipe from Linda Tripp, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia County. Visit our website for recipe, tips and more at www.southerntieresny.org

Emotional Intelligence

Use Emotional Intelligence to Establish Boundaries in Your Relationships
by Tyrone Dixon
Copyright © November 2017 All rights reserved.

Boundaries reflect how we love ourselves and what we value. Knowing when you want to say yes to something, when you want to say no to someone, self-respect, and knowing when your own needs start and end are the basics of setting boundaries in our relationships. Most us have trouble with establishing boundaries in our relationships because it is not something we discuss in our society as often as we should. When was the last time you sat down with someone who you are in a relationship with and set boundaries? Recently I spoke with a married couple and the woman explained that there are times where she is not in the mood for sexual intercourse with her spouse, but since he is her husband she feels obligated to please him. That is a perfect example of not having established healthy boundaries in a relationship.

While I agree with the fact that a wife should look to please her husband, and vice versa, when pleasing someone comes at the expense of your very own agony it is not worth it. Because we are not having conversations that center around boundaries and self-love we put ourselves in positions where we compromise our boundaries to please others. In most cases our boundaries are at extremes, either we are hyper vigilant about our needs and wants to the point we are not taking other people’s needs into consideration or we are dormant about our own needs and wants, allowing other’s to assert themselves while we “go along with it.”

Examples of someone with hyper-vigilant boundaries in a relationship would be the man/woman who knows that no matter how many times their significant other says “if you continue to do… I am going to leave/break up with/file for divorce”; they know that person is not going to follow through on those words with action. Another example of a person with hyper-vigilant boundaries would be that person who is always “my way or the highway” uncompromising, and uninterested in trying to do things anyone else’s way. Dormant boundaries in a relationship could be nonexistent, shaky, and/or inconsistent. The individual with dormant boundaries has usually experienced a history of disappointment in his/her relationships, struggles with establishing connections, has trust issues, and is in a relationship for FEAR of being alone.

I invite you, the reader to start setting boundaries in your relationships going forward. If you struggle with setting boundaries in your relationships and are constantly feeling taken advantage of, start by spending time getting to know yourself. What do you like? What don’t you like? What are you willing to tolerate? Where do you draw the line?

Peace and love

Tyrone Dixon works as a Certified Professional Coach in the Syracuse Community through his business ArozeThrough Concrete Coaching. He was born and raised on the South and West Sides of Syracuse. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from SUNY Buffalo. It is his pleasure to be a “writing contributor” for CNY Latino, and write about the topic of Emotional Intelligence (EI). He loves the City of Syracuse and believes that exposure to Emotional Intelligence can help change the direction of the individuals living in some of our “high poverty” areas. Can you imagine how much better our city would be if people were taught how to manage their feelings without hurting someone? Or if we could teach people to be proactive in identifying situations they are not comfortable in?.

Citizen Coyote

Reviewed by Linda DeStefano

“Citizen Coyote: Getting to Know Them – An Introduction” is an excellent 24 minute You Tube video available in English and Spanish. It provides a lot of information in a manner which is appropriate for elementary children right through to adults.

Janet Kessler took many photos of the coyotes she encountered in her walks in California as well as some videos, including the sounds of coyotes “singing.” Kessler clearly loves coyotes and wants to stop their persecution by people who unnecessarily fear them or find them a nuisance.

She uses a good teaching style geared to children by pointing out the similarities between people and coyotes, such as, both we and coyotes live in families and protect our children and our territory.

She says we now see coyotes in cities because people have destroyed much of their habitat. Also, sport hunters kill coyotes in rural areas but are not allowed to do so in the cities so coyotes feel safer in urban areas. And they can find plenty of natural food: fruit, rodents, birds, insects, etc.. They prefer this to our garbage so only a small per cent of their diet comes from garbage.

She advises that people are seldom approached aggressively by coyotes but it is always best to keep a safe distance away. If necessary, walk (do not run) away from the coyote. Keep dogs on a leach as the dog may chase the coyote – not good for either of them. Do not allow your cat or dog to wander and do not even leave them unsupervised in your yard as coyotes can scale a six foot fence.

Kessler encourages students to do coyote projects and send the information to her for possible posting on a webpage. She can be reached at coyotecoexistence@gmail.com

The video can be accessed at https://youtu.be/sZy3FJuVUbE

Linda is President of People for Animal Rights, P.O. Box 15358, Syracuse 13215-0358, people4animalrightscny@gmail.com, (315)488-PURR (7877) between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m. This article was translated in spanish by Rob English.