Go Further with Food- Plan ahead to save money and reduce waste!

HEALTH

CCE Onondaga Eat Smart NY- March 2018

March is National Nutrition Month! A perfect time to celebrate the healthy and wholesome meals that bring us together with the people we care about. Healthy family meals can be low cost and easy to prepare. First, check out the food that you have on hand. Then make a list of additional ingredients needed to prepare recipes with foods that are readily available and best yet, in season. Bring family and friends around the table to create meaningful memories over a nourishing meal.

The theme for this year’s National Nutrition Month is “Go Further with Food”. The message reminds us to be mindful to choose health promoting foods and to reduce the amount of food we waste. Reducing food waste saves money, protects the environment and saves valuable nutrients that our body needs for energy, growth and to repair itself.

Wasting food is expensive. Not all food that is wasted can be saved and eaten, but a lot of food waste could be prevented. One of the obvious reasons to reduce food waste for many people is that it costs money. However, wasted food also results in wasted nutrients. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and seafood are often the foods that are wasted.

We are faced with higher food prices and lose money when food spoils at home or gets thrown out as plate waste. In addition, much of the food that is tossed out winds up in landfills, and over time this can cause negative changes in the earth’s climate.

Did you know that about 1,200 calories of food are wasted daily in the United States? When we think of the nutrition these foods provide, that amounts to losses of protein, dietary fiber, and vitamins and minerals, such as calcium and vitamin D.

Ways to help prevent food waste:

• Buy only the amount of food that can be eaten or frozen within a few days.
• Place foods that spoil quickly within sight.
• Store produce properly.
• As with other foods, to prevent spoilage only buy the amount of fresh fruits and vegetables you can use within a few days.
• Produce should always be washed before using, but some produce may spoil more quickly if it’s washed too far in advance.
• Refrigeration is recommended for a lot of produce, especially fruits and vegetables that are conveniently packaged or already cut up. Plus, some produce will last longer when refrigerated, such as apples and oranges. Whereas, other produce like onions and potatoes are best stored outside of the refrigerator.
• Because some produce, like apples can cause other fruits and vegetables to ripen more quickly it’s best to keep them in a separate crisper drawer.
• Regardless of the date stamped on the food or drink packaging, don’t risk eating or drinking anything that you suspect has spoiled. In some cases a food will not look or smell any different. That’s why it’s important to eat leftovers within 3 to 4 days (or freeze for up to 3 to 4 months).
• Always remember to practice good food safety!
• For more food safety information, visit www.homefoodsafety.org or check out the “Is My Food Safe” app.
• The USDA’s FoodKeeper app is another good resource. It helps you determine how long items may be kept in the refrigerator, freezer, or pantry. Knowing this information will help you identify what needs to be used up when planning meals or deciding what to do with leftovers.

Save money and reduce food waste by:

• Planning meals based on foods you already have.

 Look in the refrigerator, freezer, and pantry first for foods that need to be used up. These items will give you ideas about what recipes to make for the week.
 Find recipes that use those ingredients.
 Write a list of the food items you still need.

• Planning meals and snacks in advance is a good place to start and will help you use the foods you already have on hand.
• Another way to prevent food waste is to get creative with leftovers.
• A meal doesn’t always need to be eaten in the same way as a leftover. A lot of times, it can be transformed into another meal, a soup, salad, or even a sandwich.
• Roast a whole chicken or turkey for dinner. The leftovers could be shredded, reheated and added to a soup on Monday night or wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla with low-fat cheese and veggies for lunch.
• Other ways to Go Further with Food include being mindful of portion sizes. Over the years, portions of most foods and drinks have increased in size.
• Choosing smaller portions will not only help to reduce food waste, but it will also help you stay within your calorie needs, as MyPlate recommends.
• If it’s not possible to request a smaller portion when eating out, just ask for a to-go container at the start of a meal. This will help you eat less. Plus, you’ll have a leftover to enjoy the next day.

For tasty, low cost recipes, tips and more go to www.eatsmartnewyork.org.

Southern Tier Eat Smart NY is funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program- SNAP. SNAP Provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. To find out more go to www.myBenefits.ny.gov or contact 1-800-342-3009. This Institution is an equal opportunity employer.

Using select text from Shakespeare

R.Evolución Latina and Pregones/Prtt’s Raul Julia Training Unit Partner in an Interdisciplinary Professional Training workshop

by Katie Rosin

The Beyond Broadway Workshop Series (BWS), an interdisciplinary (acting, dance, music) professional development workshop and outreach program with professional teaching artists from Broadway, Film and TV, was started by Luis Salgado and R.Evolución Latina (RL) an organization that utilizes the arts to empower the Latino community. Now in their tenth year, RL is partnering with Pregones/Puerto Rican Traveling Theater (PRTT) and their historic Raúl Juliá Training Unit for this year’s BWS, offering excellent, affordable training, combined with rehearsal and performance opportunities, training students to face challenges, building their self-confidence while cultivating the leadership skills necessary to unite and inspire.

Using select text from Shakespeare, integrating music and dance, the BWS will culminate in a devised piece of theatre, developed by the RL creative team supported by PRTT’s Raul Julia Training Unit, and will be performed at the Harlem School for the Arts. In order to constantly grow as artists and activists, those selected to be members of BWS’s Class of 2018 will have performance and outreach events throughout the workshop and throughout the year.

Luis Salgado, RL director, states, “This year’s thematic focus is “language”, “going beyond” and “embracing your tribe” through the words of Shakespeare.” He is excited that “participants will not only move beyond their fears and the realities of society as artists and/or immigrants, but they will also share their truth, their humanity, and their own artistic contributions. We believe that it is opportunities like this one that build a greater community. We seek artists that are dedicated to growing and giving back through their art.”

“Partnering with R.Evolución Latina’s Beyond Workshops Series is a coherent, exciting step for our Training Unit. We have a common goal and commitment to rigorous arts training, and to creating exciting opportunities for growth and impact in our communities,” states Rosalba Rolón, Artistic Director Pregones/PRTT.

RL has provided approximately 30 scholarships between Mexico, Colombia, Argentina and beyond, to continue to inspire young professionals and expose them to an overall artistic experience in NYC.

Press Release provided by Media Representative: Katie Rosin / Kampfire PR. For more information go to
http://revolucionlatina.org/

Emotional Intelligence for Men

Eight Emotionally Intelligent things Men can do Immediately to End Abuse
by Tyrone Dixon

Copyright © February 2018 / All rights reserved.

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending a Workshop with some extremely intelligent gentlemen. The workshop centered on what we as men can do to help end domestic and sexual violence, as well as address the issue of “toxic masculinity.”

At the end of the workshop each of us made a commitment, my commitment was to advocate on behalf of both men and women and not sit back and watch abuse take place rather physical, emotional, or verbal.

As a first step in the keeping my commitment, I present the following 8 tips, adapted from Author, Educator Jackson Katz’s 10 Things Men Can Do To Prevent Gender Violence:

1. Understand that this is not only a women’s issue! We as men can be advocates by speaking up, and confronting abusive peers. 90% of domestic and sexual violence is committed by men; chances are you know/have hung out with someone who was physically or verbally abusive. Speak up!

2. If you associate with individuals (friends, brother, coworker, etc.) who are disrespectful or abusive to females, don’t remain silent. Stop the abuse, and then recommend they seek professional help with dealing with unaddressed trauma in their lives.

3. Have the self-awareness to look at the way you live your life. Question your beliefs and attitudes towards women, without becoming defensive. How might the way we live inadvertently perpetuate sexism and violence? When you are able to take an introspective look at yourself, you can begin to change bad habits.

4. If you suspect someone you know is being abused or has been sexually assaulted, kindly ask them if there is any way you could help. Please don’t become aggressive/threaten to assault the perpetrator, this is not the support the person close to you needs in the moment.

5. If you are emotionally, psychologically, physically, or sexually abusive to women, or have been in the past. I invite you to seek professional help because you may have suppressed trauma that is preventing you from being your true self.

6. Be an ally to women who are working to end all forms of gender violence. Attend rallies and other public events to show your support. On March 23rd, 2018 Vera House Incorporated will be holding its “24th Annual White Ribbon Campaign” to raise awareness about domestic and sexual violence, this would be a great way to get involved and become an ally.

7. Educate yourself and those around you by attending programs, watching videos online, and reading articles about causes of gender violence. Understand that larger social forces affect the conflicts between men and women.

8. Mentor the next generation of young men about how to be a man in ways that don’t involve degrading or abusing women.

Peace and Love,

Tyrone Dixon works as a Certified Professional Coach in the Syracuse Community through his business ArozeThrough Concrete Coaching. He was born and raised on the South and West Sides of Syracuse. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from SUNY Buffalo. It is his pleasure to be a “writing contributor” for CNY Latino, and write about the topic of Emotional Intelligence (EI). He loves the City of Syracuse and believes that exposure to Emotional Intelligence can help change the direction of the individuals living in some of our “high poverty” areas. Can you imagine how much better our city would be if people were taught how to manage their feelings without hurting someone? Or if we could teach people to be proactive in identifying situations they are not comfortable in?.

Science, Tango, Hugs: a Profile of Joaquin Canay

by Maximilian Eyle

Joaquin Canay is a professional tango instructor turned biotech-engineer. He hails from Buenos Aires but has lived in New York State for more than 15 years. He is very tall, with lots of curly brown hair and a bubbly personality. Joaquin sat down with me to discuss what he has learned living in the United States and what he feels the United States could learn from Argentina.

You were born in Buenos Aires, how did you come to live in Buffalo, NY?

When I was 18 years old I moved to New York City. I didn’t speak any English but I spent 3 years there. I taught a little tango, took some English classes, and worked odd jobs as a bouncer and promoter in the music scene. Eventually I found an opportunity to teach tango in Ithaca. I did that for 11 years full time. Back in Argentina I had taken one year of med school, so I decided to get my associated degree at Tompkins County Community College in Biotechnology. The teachers were incredible – some of the best I have ever had. I was then accepted into the biotech program at University of Buffalo where I earned by bachelor’s degree.

What type of work do you do now?

I work now for Thermo-Fisher in the research and development group where I help design new products. Right now we are working on developing mediums for cell growth in the lab. When scientists have to growth cells in a petri dish, they have to put the cells in a substance so they grow. We make that substance for laboratories across the world, it’s very exciting.

What do you miss most about life in Argentina?

I miss my friends and family the most, of course. Argentina is a gorgeous country but people are what you miss the most. They have a different attitude toward life. People are much closer in Argentina, in terms of physical space. They touch, they stand closer. Here, they are not used to such contact. When I came here, people were bothered by how close I would stand when I talked to them. In Argentina, we hug and kiss all the time. Here, people are much more distant.

For example, you can just stop by a friend’s house without warning back home. If they are feeling bad, you can just go and take them out. Here, you need to call first. Friends are an extension of the family. In America, the term doesn’t mean quite the same thing. It is hard for people to form those stronger friendships without feeling comfortable being open and close with each other.

I also miss dancing. I used to dance every day but now it is once every week or two. Tango was always my salvation to help me adapt to this culture much faster. In tango, you have so much personal contact, you are hugging the person for the duration of the dance. It grounded me and made this foreign land seem familiar. It is hard to describe the feeling you get when you dance, but I miss it. Even though I like my job very much, after a year of working there, I haven’t touched any of my coworkers. It is a very strange feeling.

What could Americans learn from Argentineans?

We are all animals, and our lives are short and pointless. For this reason we must enjoy it. The “time is money” philosophy reduces people’s ability to enjoy their lives. They have coffee with a friend for an hour but are in a rush because they have to be somewhere else rather than enjoying the moment. Americans need to learn how to enjoy the small moments better, to live within the community and with less pressure.

Maximilian Eyle is a native of Syracuse, NY and a graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He works as a media consultant and writes each month about a variety of issues for Spanish-language papers across New York State. Maximilian has a love of Hispanic culture and learned Spanish while living in Spain where he studied and worked as an English teacher. He can be contacted at maxeyle@gmail.com.

“Milk Hurts”

by Teresa Melnick
Translated into Spanish by Rob English

From California’s “Happy Cow” campaign, to the catchy “Got Milk?” celebrity ads, dairy product advertising is relentless in its efforts to convince consumers that its products are wholesome, nutritious, and support the iconic family farm. We are surrounded by images of contented cows, lazily munching grass in glorious green pastures. The truth is a far cry from this idyllic pastoral scene. Unfortunately, most consumers don’t know the ugly facts about the dairy industry’s treatment of cows as disposable milk producing machines. Animal activist Ashely Capp is doing something about that with the creation of a new website Milk Hurts, and her campaign, “Mothers Against Dairy.”

Capp, a writer and editor for the website A Well Fed World, explains her upcoming Milk Hurts website: “Essentially Milk Hurts is intended to become the ‘go to’ comprehensive anti-dairy resource and database with ‘Mothers Against Dairy’ as one of its campaigns and ongoing web features.” The site will be a place where people can go to find the most current, comprehensive, fact-based research on the dairy industry’s harmful effects on animals, human health, and the environment, she says.

Capp started the campaign, “Mothers Against Dairy,” when she learned of a new direction the dairy industry was taking in its advertising.

“Mothers Against Dairy was launched as a way to directly counter the aggressive surge in pro-dairy messaging from female dairy farmers (most of them mothers) that I have encountered in my dairy research over the last several years,” Capp says. “I believe this trend is no coincidence, rather, in a climate of increased criticism of dairy farming practices, it represents a strategic industry shift to put more female faces on dairy farming, and to deceptively reframe the industry as a maternal nurturing one.”

Maternal and nurturing are not adjectives Capp would use to describe the dairy industry. Calves are removed from their mothers soon after birth and fed artificially, while the mother’s milk is harvested for human consumption. This is emotionally and physically damaging for both the cow and the calf, who visibly grieve the separation. The mother is again impregnated and the whole cycle begins again.

Capp has collected compelling first- hand accounts from women who realized, after giving birth themselves, that they could no longer support an industry that callously exploits the motherhood of cows.

(The Milk Hurts website will launch later this year, but for now you can follow them on Instagram and Facebook, or go to A Well Fed World for a link to “Mothers Against Dairy”).

Teresa Melnick is a member of People for Animal Rights (PAR). You can contact PAR at P.O. Box 15358, Syracuse 13215-0358, (315)488-PURR (7877) between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m., people4animalrightscny@gmail.com. You can also contact Linda DeStefano who is the President of People for Animal Rights or find more information at peopleforanimalrightsofcny.org.

Lady of the Arts: A Profile of Tere Paniagua

by Maximilian Eyle

La Casita Cultural Center and Punto de Contacto (Point of Contact) are two of the foremost Latino cultural institutions in Syracuse. Point of Contact is celebrating its 42nd year of showcasing Latin American contemporary art and literature, while the newer La Casita has blossomed into an active community center that provides educational opportunities, historical awareness, and cultural exhibitions. A peek behind the curtain of each reveals the tireless work of Tere Paniagua, Executive Director of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community at Syracuse University – an educator of Puerto Rican descent who has been a driving force in Syracuse’s art and culture community for over 15 years.

Tere is a slender, energetic woman with long silver hair and an ever-present smile. Before coming to Syracuse, Tere spent over 20 years working as a journalist profiling artists and literary figures in Puerto Rico and Los Angeles. She earned her degree from Syracuse University, Class of ‘82 and developed a strong connection to the city where she has now raised three children. In 2002 she started work at SU’s Latino and Latin American Studies program (LLAS) and the Department of Languages, where she began teaching and designed her own course in Spanish titled Hispanic Journalistic Practices. One of her colleagues was Point of Contact founder, Pedro Cuperman. She began helping him out and working with him during her extra time and soon fell in love with the gallery’s projects.

Today she is Point of Contact’s Executive Director, working to further the gallery’s role as a platform for showcasing visual artists and literary figures from Latin America. “People often have a preconceived notion of what Latin American art is,” Tere explains, “Point of Contact allows us to break many of those stereotypes.” One of the most important things that the gallery does is shine light on new artists, drawing attention to emerging voices in the arts community. Currently, Point of Contact is working with Abisay Puentes to plan a show for next year. The Cuban-born painter is known for his dual approach of presenting his visual work with a corresponding orchestral soundtrack.

Tere’s second project, La Casita, opened in 2011 with a distinct mission: to focus on the local community, to work with Syracuse youth, and to provide educational programs that integrate with the life of the community. La Casita presents opportunities for students that have a special interest in Syracuse’s Latino community to work as volunteers, mentors, and instructors. They exhibit visual arts, music, and dance – including monthly Argentine tango events. Tere says the goal is to choose “exhibitions that document the traditions and the life of this community.” Exhibits often include historic photos, memorabilia, and other artifacts that tell family histories among Latinos in Syracuse.

There is also an archival element to the work of La Casita. In 2017, they featured a beautiful collection of traditional musical instruments from Caribbean cultures that examines the history of that musical heritage. Before that, there was an exhibition telling the stories of Latino veterans and documenting the experiences of local and campus Latino families who had members in the military, with interviews exploring their experiences. Two years ago, La Casita entered into a partnership with the Smithsonian Institution to engage in a project that would showcase community collections. The theme of the project is “Latinos in Baseball”, presenting a view of Latino baseball culture “from the barrios to the big leagues.” The Smithsonian project now includes nearly 2 dozen partner galleries and cultural centers across the nation and will culminate in an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. in 2020 before becoming a traveling show.

“The scope of these projects would not be possible without the help and support of Syracuse University and the College of Arts & Sciences,” Tere explains. But the benefits are not one sided. While the community is nourished by the many cultural resources provided by La Casita and Point of Contact, the University is rewarded with a wealth of opportunities for student involvement, experiential learning and career advancement. Speaking to the future of Latinos in Syracuse, Tere reinforces the importance of these cultural institutions. “We ought to feel very proud of this community,” Tere says, “It is essential that we expose our youth, our students to our proud history, to our rich traditions, and to the art of our people.”

The Point of Contact Gallery is located at The Warehouse Building, 350 W Fayette St, Syracuse, NY 13202

La Casita Cultural Center is located at 109 Otisco St, Syracuse, NY 13204

Maximilian Eyle is a native of Syracuse, NY and a graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He works as a media consultant and writes each month about a variety of issues for Spanish-language papers across New York State. Maximilian has a love of Hispanic culture and learned Spanish while living in Spain where he studied and worked as an English teacher. He can be contacted at maxeyle@gmail.com.

Here we go again…

Here we go again… this time is… fourteen…!!!
by Hugo Acosta

Here we go again, usually during the last week of (each) January, when I take a few minutes to reflect, to contemplate, to think about it, and… to prepare content for these annual editorials… something that this time will be shorter and quick… something that almost was not done, but (thanks to my editor in chief, Marisol Hernandez) it happened…

So, to keep that “short and quick approach, I am not going to narrate again, the continuing straggle and still-growing difficulty of the newspaper business, I am not going to develop on the “ups and downs” we might have gone through this year, and yes, I am not going to expose much of the possible professional (or personal) issues I might have gone through this year, and I am not going to present some peculiar weird analogy of the number 14 (like I have done in past anniversary times).

This time, I am going to simply indicate that one more time, this anniversary moment commemoration, still makes me feel the sense and emotion of accomplishment, and the strong gratification of achievement, for something that I like to do, and that I still do with love. Producing this ethnic publication (and the other Hispanic Media Outlets we provide) keeps giving me not only the financial support for me and my family, but also an enjoyment and delight to serve my culture. I do apologize if this drier and shorter editorial might have disappointed some (maybe even my editor in chief, Marisol Hernandez), and I apologize if the expected drama and fuss is not there like in the past, but in addition of going through a really busy and hectic time in this beginning of the year, some other (personal) issues might have somehow tinted or affected the inspiration and motivation I usually get, to prepare and develop a better editorial.

I still want to thank the ones that not only helped us and supported us in the making and existence of this 14-year old project (specially clients, associates, and staff), but I also want to thank to those that believe (and are still believing) in this product, and in my culture, and believe in the efforts that Marisol & I have been putting for the last 14 years… and planning to continue doing for… many more years in the future.