Go Further with Food- Plan ahead to save money and reduce waste!

HEALTH

CCE Onondaga Eat Smart NY- March 2018

March is National Nutrition Month! A perfect time to celebrate the healthy and wholesome meals that bring us together with the people we care about. Healthy family meals can be low cost and easy to prepare. First, check out the food that you have on hand. Then make a list of additional ingredients needed to prepare recipes with foods that are readily available and best yet, in season. Bring family and friends around the table to create meaningful memories over a nourishing meal.

The theme for this year’s National Nutrition Month is “Go Further with Food”. The message reminds us to be mindful to choose health promoting foods and to reduce the amount of food we waste. Reducing food waste saves money, protects the environment and saves valuable nutrients that our body needs for energy, growth and to repair itself.

Wasting food is expensive. Not all food that is wasted can be saved and eaten, but a lot of food waste could be prevented. One of the obvious reasons to reduce food waste for many people is that it costs money. However, wasted food also results in wasted nutrients. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and seafood are often the foods that are wasted.

We are faced with higher food prices and lose money when food spoils at home or gets thrown out as plate waste. In addition, much of the food that is tossed out winds up in landfills, and over time this can cause negative changes in the earth’s climate.

Did you know that about 1,200 calories of food are wasted daily in the United States? When we think of the nutrition these foods provide, that amounts to losses of protein, dietary fiber, and vitamins and minerals, such as calcium and vitamin D.

Ways to help prevent food waste:

• Buy only the amount of food that can be eaten or frozen within a few days.
• Place foods that spoil quickly within sight.
• Store produce properly.
• As with other foods, to prevent spoilage only buy the amount of fresh fruits and vegetables you can use within a few days.
• Produce should always be washed before using, but some produce may spoil more quickly if it’s washed too far in advance.
• Refrigeration is recommended for a lot of produce, especially fruits and vegetables that are conveniently packaged or already cut up. Plus, some produce will last longer when refrigerated, such as apples and oranges. Whereas, other produce like onions and potatoes are best stored outside of the refrigerator.
• Because some produce, like apples can cause other fruits and vegetables to ripen more quickly it’s best to keep them in a separate crisper drawer.
• Regardless of the date stamped on the food or drink packaging, don’t risk eating or drinking anything that you suspect has spoiled. In some cases a food will not look or smell any different. That’s why it’s important to eat leftovers within 3 to 4 days (or freeze for up to 3 to 4 months).
• Always remember to practice good food safety!
• For more food safety information, visit www.homefoodsafety.org or check out the “Is My Food Safe” app.
• The USDA’s FoodKeeper app is another good resource. It helps you determine how long items may be kept in the refrigerator, freezer, or pantry. Knowing this information will help you identify what needs to be used up when planning meals or deciding what to do with leftovers.

Save money and reduce food waste by:

• Planning meals based on foods you already have.

 Look in the refrigerator, freezer, and pantry first for foods that need to be used up. These items will give you ideas about what recipes to make for the week.
 Find recipes that use those ingredients.
 Write a list of the food items you still need.

• Planning meals and snacks in advance is a good place to start and will help you use the foods you already have on hand.
• Another way to prevent food waste is to get creative with leftovers.
• A meal doesn’t always need to be eaten in the same way as a leftover. A lot of times, it can be transformed into another meal, a soup, salad, or even a sandwich.
• Roast a whole chicken or turkey for dinner. The leftovers could be shredded, reheated and added to a soup on Monday night or wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla with low-fat cheese and veggies for lunch.
• Other ways to Go Further with Food include being mindful of portion sizes. Over the years, portions of most foods and drinks have increased in size.
• Choosing smaller portions will not only help to reduce food waste, but it will also help you stay within your calorie needs, as MyPlate recommends.
• If it’s not possible to request a smaller portion when eating out, just ask for a to-go container at the start of a meal. This will help you eat less. Plus, you’ll have a leftover to enjoy the next day.

For tasty, low cost recipes, tips and more go to www.eatsmartnewyork.org.

Southern Tier Eat Smart NY is funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program- SNAP. SNAP Provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. To find out more go to www.myBenefits.ny.gov or contact 1-800-342-3009. This Institution is an equal opportunity employer.

Emotional Intelligence for Men

Eight Emotionally Intelligent things Men can do Immediately to End Abuse
by Tyrone Dixon

Copyright © February 2018 / All rights reserved.

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending a Workshop with some extremely intelligent gentlemen. The workshop centered on what we as men can do to help end domestic and sexual violence, as well as address the issue of “toxic masculinity.”

At the end of the workshop each of us made a commitment, my commitment was to advocate on behalf of both men and women and not sit back and watch abuse take place rather physical, emotional, or verbal.

As a first step in the keeping my commitment, I present the following 8 tips, adapted from Author, Educator Jackson Katz’s 10 Things Men Can Do To Prevent Gender Violence:

1. Understand that this is not only a women’s issue! We as men can be advocates by speaking up, and confronting abusive peers. 90% of domestic and sexual violence is committed by men; chances are you know/have hung out with someone who was physically or verbally abusive. Speak up!

2. If you associate with individuals (friends, brother, coworker, etc.) who are disrespectful or abusive to females, don’t remain silent. Stop the abuse, and then recommend they seek professional help with dealing with unaddressed trauma in their lives.

3. Have the self-awareness to look at the way you live your life. Question your beliefs and attitudes towards women, without becoming defensive. How might the way we live inadvertently perpetuate sexism and violence? When you are able to take an introspective look at yourself, you can begin to change bad habits.

4. If you suspect someone you know is being abused or has been sexually assaulted, kindly ask them if there is any way you could help. Please don’t become aggressive/threaten to assault the perpetrator, this is not the support the person close to you needs in the moment.

5. If you are emotionally, psychologically, physically, or sexually abusive to women, or have been in the past. I invite you to seek professional help because you may have suppressed trauma that is preventing you from being your true self.

6. Be an ally to women who are working to end all forms of gender violence. Attend rallies and other public events to show your support. On March 23rd, 2018 Vera House Incorporated will be holding its “24th Annual White Ribbon Campaign” to raise awareness about domestic and sexual violence, this would be a great way to get involved and become an ally.

7. Educate yourself and those around you by attending programs, watching videos online, and reading articles about causes of gender violence. Understand that larger social forces affect the conflicts between men and women.

8. Mentor the next generation of young men about how to be a man in ways that don’t involve degrading or abusing women.

Peace and Love,

Tyrone Dixon works as a Certified Professional Coach in the Syracuse Community through his business ArozeThrough Concrete Coaching. He was born and raised on the South and West Sides of Syracuse. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from SUNY Buffalo. It is his pleasure to be a “writing contributor” for CNY Latino, and write about the topic of Emotional Intelligence (EI). He loves the City of Syracuse and believes that exposure to Emotional Intelligence can help change the direction of the individuals living in some of our “high poverty” areas. Can you imagine how much better our city would be if people were taught how to manage their feelings without hurting someone? Or if we could teach people to be proactive in identifying situations they are not comfortable in?.

“Milk Hurts”

by Teresa Melnick
Translated into Spanish by Rob English

From California’s “Happy Cow” campaign, to the catchy “Got Milk?” celebrity ads, dairy product advertising is relentless in its efforts to convince consumers that its products are wholesome, nutritious, and support the iconic family farm. We are surrounded by images of contented cows, lazily munching grass in glorious green pastures. The truth is a far cry from this idyllic pastoral scene. Unfortunately, most consumers don’t know the ugly facts about the dairy industry’s treatment of cows as disposable milk producing machines. Animal activist Ashely Capp is doing something about that with the creation of a new website Milk Hurts, and her campaign, “Mothers Against Dairy.”

Capp, a writer and editor for the website A Well Fed World, explains her upcoming Milk Hurts website: “Essentially Milk Hurts is intended to become the ‘go to’ comprehensive anti-dairy resource and database with ‘Mothers Against Dairy’ as one of its campaigns and ongoing web features.” The site will be a place where people can go to find the most current, comprehensive, fact-based research on the dairy industry’s harmful effects on animals, human health, and the environment, she says.

Capp started the campaign, “Mothers Against Dairy,” when she learned of a new direction the dairy industry was taking in its advertising.

“Mothers Against Dairy was launched as a way to directly counter the aggressive surge in pro-dairy messaging from female dairy farmers (most of them mothers) that I have encountered in my dairy research over the last several years,” Capp says. “I believe this trend is no coincidence, rather, in a climate of increased criticism of dairy farming practices, it represents a strategic industry shift to put more female faces on dairy farming, and to deceptively reframe the industry as a maternal nurturing one.”

Maternal and nurturing are not adjectives Capp would use to describe the dairy industry. Calves are removed from their mothers soon after birth and fed artificially, while the mother’s milk is harvested for human consumption. This is emotionally and physically damaging for both the cow and the calf, who visibly grieve the separation. The mother is again impregnated and the whole cycle begins again.

Capp has collected compelling first- hand accounts from women who realized, after giving birth themselves, that they could no longer support an industry that callously exploits the motherhood of cows.

(The Milk Hurts website will launch later this year, but for now you can follow them on Instagram and Facebook, or go to A Well Fed World for a link to “Mothers Against Dairy”).

Teresa Melnick is a member of People for Animal Rights (PAR). You can contact PAR at P.O. Box 15358, Syracuse 13215-0358, (315)488-PURR (7877) between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m., people4animalrightscny@gmail.com. You can also contact Linda DeStefano who is the President of People for Animal Rights or find more information at peopleforanimalrightsofcny.org.

A Recipe for Your Valentine

by Linda DeStefano

February includes the romantic holiday of St. Valentine’s Day (also known simply as Valentine’s Day). Sweets are a common gift. Here is a recipe for a chocolate cake with chocolate frosting, which is easy and should please anyone who loves sweets and loves chocolate. It also is a gift for the animals as it contains no animal ingredients (no eggs, no dairy). Dairy cows and their babies suffer a great deal, and egg-laying hens do too (and the male chicks are killed as they can’t produce eggs).

I won’t pretend that this recipe, especially with the frosting, is healthy – too much sugar and fat – but it is a satisfying, occasional treat. The next time I make it, I’m going to try using date sugar instead of cane sugar because, according to Michael Greger, M.D., date sugar and molasses are the only two healthy sugars. Molasses flavor would be too strong for a cake, but I think date sugar (which has a mild flavor) would work well. I buy date sugar at Green Planet Grocery on W. Genesee St. in Fairmount. See nutritionfacts.org for health tips from Dr. Greger.

My friend Lisa Dwinell brought this recipe to my attention.

Crazy Chocolate Cake

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Ingredients:

2 tablespoon of white or apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 cup flour
1 cup of sugar (try date sugar)
1/3 cup cocoa powder (plain – no sugar or other ingredients in it)
1 teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of baking soda
1/2 cup canola or other mild-flavored vegetable oil
1 cup water
2 teaspoonful of vanilla or almond abstract

Mix all ingredients at the same time except the vinegar. A whisk works nicely. Then add the vinegar and stir. IMMEDIATELY put in over preheated to 350 degrees. Bake about 20 minutes. Place cake tester in middle of cake to see that it is not liquid in the middle. The batter fills one square tin (about 8 1/2 x 8 1/2) or one round tin. Grease the tin with oil or vegan margarine (such as, Earth Balance).

I use chocolate frosting from The Compassionate Cook.

3 oz. unsweetened chocolate
1 teaspoon vegan margarine (such as Earth Balance)
1/4 cup hot water (start with cold and then heat in kettle or pan rather than using from the hot water tap)
2 cups confectioners’ sugar

Over very low heat, melt the chocolate and margarine together. Transfer to a mixing bowl and add the water. Slowly stir in sugar until creamy.

Allow the cake to cool before frosting it.

This cake is an example of tasty vegan cooking. Vegans eat no animal flesh or animal products (particularly dairy and eggs) but do eat veggies, fruits, grains, beans, legumes, nuts, seeds and all the many dishes made from them.

Vegan eating is good for the environment, the animals, the reduction of world hunger, and for your health. If you want to learn more and even have free personal counseling as you try vegan eating, go to veganoutreach.org and find the Vegan Mentor Program.

There are many sources of vegan recipes online, such as, findingvegan.com

There are also many cookbooks. Here are a few below, all of which can be ordered at barnesandnoble.com. If you are like me and don’t like to order online, you can order directly from the Barnes and Noble in Syracuse at (315) 449-2948.

Dairy-Free And Delicious by Bryanna Clark Grogan & Joanne Stepaniak. Besides recipes, there’s a lot of information about how to eat a healthy diet without dairy. Even for those who are not vegan, this is helpful for people with dairy allergies.

The Compassionate Cook: Please Don’t Eat the Animals by Ingrid Newkirk

The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook by Joanne Stepaniak

For those who want both vegan and gluten-free recipes, there is The Gluten-Free Vegan by Susan O’Brien.

If want to join a local organization which has vegan socials (vegans and non-vegans welcome), contact Syracuse Vegan Meetup, https://www.meetup.com/Syracuse-CNY-Vegan-Meetup/, and/or People for Animal Rights.

You’ll find Syacuse Vegan Meetup on Facebook and Instagram Or contact Marybeth at mfishman4282@gmail.com

You can contact People for Animal Rights at (315)488-PURR (7877) between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m., people4animalrightscny@gmail.com or PAR, P.O. Box 15358, Syracuse, NY 133215-0358. PAR also has films and speakers on a variety of animal rights and environmental protection issues and puts out a physical newsletter twice a year.

HEALTH

Eating Disorder

by Ria Pal

For most Americans, the typical patient with an eating disorder is a thin, wealthy Caucasian female. In reality, there is a tremendous range of patients, and this stereotype causes families and medical providers alike to overlook symptoms and treatment for a potentially devastating disease with psychological and physiological consequences.

Information about the prevalence of eating disorders in ethnic minority groups, particularly Latinos, is virtually unknown — several studies on eating disorders have left out Latinos as a group entirely. Yet, several studies have reported higher rates of eating disorder symptoms and body dissatisfaction among Latino groups than among non-Hispanic whites or among other ethnic minority females. For example, studies have reported a higher and more severe prevalence of binge eating among Latino females compared to White, African American, and Asian American women. Population-based surveys of adolescents found that rates of dieting and using laxatives were highest among Latinas. Studies of body image found that unlike some other ethnic groups, who idealize very thin bodies, Latinos often idealize bodies that are simultaneously thin and curvy.

The most common eating disorders are anorexia (avoiding eating altogether) and bulimia (overeating and then “purging” to get rid of the food through forced vomiting or laxative use). Among Latinos, however, the most common diagnosis is called OSFED, “Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder.” OSFED is equally serious, but does not fit into a definition as easily. Behaviors that would be categorized as OSFED include binge-eating, excessive eating at night, and purging without overeating.

Regardless of age, gender, weight, or immigration status, people who think they may have unhealthy eating behaviors deserve help. Beyond the initial challenges of recognizing the symptoms and breaking the stigma, affording eating disorder treatment is hard. But there are alternatives to pocket-draining residential treatment programs that average at $30,000 a month. Often just an inquiry and application away, some treatment facilities do offer scholarships and grants. Teaching hospitals or mental health facilities, which often offer free services, might also be an option. Then there are support groups, online and offline, which exist to both help guide people in their search for assistance and act as an inexpensive and effective way to talk and help one another deal with the variety of concerns and challenges that come with disordered eating.

It can be helpful to think of eating disorders as a chronic disease, one that may become better but is at a risk for relapse. It is important for people to take precautions against relapsing, especially when they are doing better. People with eating disorders can benefit from a wide range of options for help, which include support groups (which can be found at http://www.anad.org/get-help/find-support-groups-treatment/), therapists, dieticians, treatment centers, dentists, physicians, psychiatrists, and art or yoga therapists.

Another harmful aspect of the stereotype that eating disorders affect only white people is that few resources have been developed for Spanish speaking patients. It can be difficult and intimidating to seek out resources in Spanish, especially in rural areas. https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/neda-espanol is a web site with basic information and a confidential, toll free hotline (1-800-931-2237). Not all of the volunteers on the hotline are Spanish speaking, but if someone who only speaks Spanish calls, they can still be assisted. If you or someone you know may have an eating disorder, take the first step to seek help.

Ria Pal is a medical student and aspiring pediatrician at the University of Rochester. She hopes to work in community health as an advocate for Spanish speaking patients. She is on the board of the school’s chapter of the Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) who are committed to contribute educational articles relevant to the Latino community.

CONGRATULATION Ria Pal on your graduation from the Rochester University. CNY Latino wishes you success in your medical career and we THANK YOU for your contribution to our bilingual publication…

Heart on Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most ethnicities in the United States. Being overweight or obese puts you at risk for many forms of heart disease. February is American Heart Month! It is a great time to take control of your weight and waist line to promote heart health.

There are many factors to consider if you are trying to lose, maintain or gain weight. Factors that influence the number of calories you need are age, height, gender and your activity level. It is important to balance calories in with calories out! When we eat more than we need our bodies store the extra calories as fat. Balance the foods you eat with the activities you do. Try to be active for 30 minutes on most days of the week.

Use these tips to stay active, eat healthy and feel your best!

• Make little changes! Try just 10 minutes of activity at a time. Take a brisk walk, pass a soccer ball, or do some push-ups. Exercising doesn’t have to be stressful. Have Fun! Do activities that you enjoy. Dance, play basketball at the gym, go sledding, or walk the mall with friends.
• Move throughout the day! Park the car further away, take the stairs, walk to a different bus stop or do yoga stretches while you watch TV! It all adds up!
• Be an active family! Get the whole family moving. Kids need at least 60 minutes of activity every day. Play catch with your kids, visit the park or go for a family bike ride. Remember, you are their greatest role model!
• Limit Screen Time! The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends limiting screen to 2 hours or less each day. This includes: TV watching; playing video games and watching movies.
• Make healthy choices! Choose whole grains like brown rice, whole wheat pasta and whole grain breads. Whole grains keep us full longer and give us the energy to be active! Drink water, low-fat milk or seltzer with a splash of 100% juice! Limit soda and juices. Soda and sugar-sweetened beverages have added sugars that can slow us down and cause weight gain.
• Balance Your Portions! Pay attention to how much food is on your plate! Taking too much food can cause us to eat more than our bodies need. Use smaller plates, cups and bowls. Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables first, then add meat and grains. Listen to your body! Notice body cues letting you know when you’re full or hungry.
• Eat slowly! Wait it out! It takes twenty minutes for your mind to realize you’re full after eating.
• Track your progress! Super tracker is a free online tool where you can get a nutrition and physical activity plan. You can also set a goal and track your food, activities and weight. Visit, www.ChooseMyPlate.gov., for tips to help you make healthier choices and plan ahead.

Tortilla Roll-Ups- Makes 12 servings; ½ tortilla= 1 servings

6 large whole wheat flour tortillas

Ingredients:
6 large whole wheat flour tortillas
1 Cup grated low fat cheddar cheese (4 oz.)
1 Cup mild salsa (8 oz.)
1 Cup black beans, drained (½ can)
1 avocado, mashed (optional)

Instructions:
1. Put the tortillas on a plate, cover with a paper towel, and microwave on High for 1 minute (optional).
2. Mix cheese, salsa, and black beans.
3. Spread a thin layer of mixture on each tortilla.
4. Top with a spoonful of avocado (optional).
5. Roll up, cut in half, and serve.

Yield: About 12 servings (½ tortilla each)

Nutrition information: Calories- 140, Total Fat- 4.5 g.,
Sodium-290 mg., Carbohydrates: 17 g, Fiber- 3 g., Sugar- 1 g.,
Protein- 6 g.

Source: Choose Health: Food, Fun, and Fitness, Cornell University 2015, recipe from Linda Tripp, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia County. Visit our website for recipe, tips and more at www.southerntieresny.org

Emotional Intelligence

Use Emotional Intelligence to Establish Boundaries in Your Relationships
by Tyrone Dixon
Copyright © November 2017 All rights reserved.

Boundaries reflect how we love ourselves and what we value. Knowing when you want to say yes to something, when you want to say no to someone, self-respect, and knowing when your own needs start and end are the basics of setting boundaries in our relationships. Most us have trouble with establishing boundaries in our relationships because it is not something we discuss in our society as often as we should. When was the last time you sat down with someone who you are in a relationship with and set boundaries? Recently I spoke with a married couple and the woman explained that there are times where she is not in the mood for sexual intercourse with her spouse, but since he is her husband she feels obligated to please him. That is a perfect example of not having established healthy boundaries in a relationship.

While I agree with the fact that a wife should look to please her husband, and vice versa, when pleasing someone comes at the expense of your very own agony it is not worth it. Because we are not having conversations that center around boundaries and self-love we put ourselves in positions where we compromise our boundaries to please others. In most cases our boundaries are at extremes, either we are hyper vigilant about our needs and wants to the point we are not taking other people’s needs into consideration or we are dormant about our own needs and wants, allowing other’s to assert themselves while we “go along with it.”

Examples of someone with hyper-vigilant boundaries in a relationship would be the man/woman who knows that no matter how many times their significant other says “if you continue to do… I am going to leave/break up with/file for divorce”; they know that person is not going to follow through on those words with action. Another example of a person with hyper-vigilant boundaries would be that person who is always “my way or the highway” uncompromising, and uninterested in trying to do things anyone else’s way. Dormant boundaries in a relationship could be nonexistent, shaky, and/or inconsistent. The individual with dormant boundaries has usually experienced a history of disappointment in his/her relationships, struggles with establishing connections, has trust issues, and is in a relationship for FEAR of being alone.

I invite you, the reader to start setting boundaries in your relationships going forward. If you struggle with setting boundaries in your relationships and are constantly feeling taken advantage of, start by spending time getting to know yourself. What do you like? What don’t you like? What are you willing to tolerate? Where do you draw the line?

Peace and love

Tyrone Dixon works as a Certified Professional Coach in the Syracuse Community through his business ArozeThrough Concrete Coaching. He was born and raised on the South and West Sides of Syracuse. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from SUNY Buffalo. It is his pleasure to be a “writing contributor” for CNY Latino, and write about the topic of Emotional Intelligence (EI). He loves the City of Syracuse and believes that exposure to Emotional Intelligence can help change the direction of the individuals living in some of our “high poverty” areas. Can you imagine how much better our city would be if people were taught how to manage their feelings without hurting someone? Or if we could teach people to be proactive in identifying situations they are not comfortable in?.