Using select text from Shakespeare

R.Evolución Latina and Pregones/Prtt’s Raul Julia Training Unit Partner in an Interdisciplinary Professional Training workshop

by Katie Rosin

The Beyond Broadway Workshop Series (BWS), an interdisciplinary (acting, dance, music) professional development workshop and outreach program with professional teaching artists from Broadway, Film and TV, was started by Luis Salgado and R.Evolución Latina (RL) an organization that utilizes the arts to empower the Latino community. Now in their tenth year, RL is partnering with Pregones/Puerto Rican Traveling Theater (PRTT) and their historic Raúl Juliá Training Unit for this year’s BWS, offering excellent, affordable training, combined with rehearsal and performance opportunities, training students to face challenges, building their self-confidence while cultivating the leadership skills necessary to unite and inspire.

Using select text from Shakespeare, integrating music and dance, the BWS will culminate in a devised piece of theatre, developed by the RL creative team supported by PRTT’s Raul Julia Training Unit, and will be performed at the Harlem School for the Arts. In order to constantly grow as artists and activists, those selected to be members of BWS’s Class of 2018 will have performance and outreach events throughout the workshop and throughout the year.

Luis Salgado, RL director, states, “This year’s thematic focus is “language”, “going beyond” and “embracing your tribe” through the words of Shakespeare.” He is excited that “participants will not only move beyond their fears and the realities of society as artists and/or immigrants, but they will also share their truth, their humanity, and their own artistic contributions. We believe that it is opportunities like this one that build a greater community. We seek artists that are dedicated to growing and giving back through their art.”

“Partnering with R.Evolución Latina’s Beyond Workshops Series is a coherent, exciting step for our Training Unit. We have a common goal and commitment to rigorous arts training, and to creating exciting opportunities for growth and impact in our communities,” states Rosalba Rolón, Artistic Director Pregones/PRTT.

RL has provided approximately 30 scholarships between Mexico, Colombia, Argentina and beyond, to continue to inspire young professionals and expose them to an overall artistic experience in NYC.

Press Release provided by Media Representative: Katie Rosin / Kampfire PR. For more information go to
http://revolucionlatina.org/

Emotional Intelligence for Men

Eight Emotionally Intelligent things Men can do Immediately to End Abuse
by Tyrone Dixon

Copyright © February 2018 / All rights reserved.

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending a Workshop with some extremely intelligent gentlemen. The workshop centered on what we as men can do to help end domestic and sexual violence, as well as address the issue of “toxic masculinity.”

At the end of the workshop each of us made a commitment, my commitment was to advocate on behalf of both men and women and not sit back and watch abuse take place rather physical, emotional, or verbal.

As a first step in the keeping my commitment, I present the following 8 tips, adapted from Author, Educator Jackson Katz’s 10 Things Men Can Do To Prevent Gender Violence:

1. Understand that this is not only a women’s issue! We as men can be advocates by speaking up, and confronting abusive peers. 90% of domestic and sexual violence is committed by men; chances are you know/have hung out with someone who was physically or verbally abusive. Speak up!

2. If you associate with individuals (friends, brother, coworker, etc.) who are disrespectful or abusive to females, don’t remain silent. Stop the abuse, and then recommend they seek professional help with dealing with unaddressed trauma in their lives.

3. Have the self-awareness to look at the way you live your life. Question your beliefs and attitudes towards women, without becoming defensive. How might the way we live inadvertently perpetuate sexism and violence? When you are able to take an introspective look at yourself, you can begin to change bad habits.

4. If you suspect someone you know is being abused or has been sexually assaulted, kindly ask them if there is any way you could help. Please don’t become aggressive/threaten to assault the perpetrator, this is not the support the person close to you needs in the moment.

5. If you are emotionally, psychologically, physically, or sexually abusive to women, or have been in the past. I invite you to seek professional help because you may have suppressed trauma that is preventing you from being your true self.

6. Be an ally to women who are working to end all forms of gender violence. Attend rallies and other public events to show your support. On March 23rd, 2018 Vera House Incorporated will be holding its “24th Annual White Ribbon Campaign” to raise awareness about domestic and sexual violence, this would be a great way to get involved and become an ally.

7. Educate yourself and those around you by attending programs, watching videos online, and reading articles about causes of gender violence. Understand that larger social forces affect the conflicts between men and women.

8. Mentor the next generation of young men about how to be a man in ways that don’t involve degrading or abusing women.

Peace and Love,

Tyrone Dixon works as a Certified Professional Coach in the Syracuse Community through his business ArozeThrough Concrete Coaching. He was born and raised on the South and West Sides of Syracuse. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from SUNY Buffalo. It is his pleasure to be a “writing contributor” for CNY Latino, and write about the topic of Emotional Intelligence (EI). He loves the City of Syracuse and believes that exposure to Emotional Intelligence can help change the direction of the individuals living in some of our “high poverty” areas. Can you imagine how much better our city would be if people were taught how to manage their feelings without hurting someone? Or if we could teach people to be proactive in identifying situations they are not comfortable in?.

Science, Tango, Hugs: a Profile of Joaquin Canay

by Maximilian Eyle

Joaquin Canay is a professional tango instructor turned biotech-engineer. He hails from Buenos Aires but has lived in New York State for more than 15 years. He is very tall, with lots of curly brown hair and a bubbly personality. Joaquin sat down with me to discuss what he has learned living in the United States and what he feels the United States could learn from Argentina.

You were born in Buenos Aires, how did you come to live in Buffalo, NY?

When I was 18 years old I moved to New York City. I didn’t speak any English but I spent 3 years there. I taught a little tango, took some English classes, and worked odd jobs as a bouncer and promoter in the music scene. Eventually I found an opportunity to teach tango in Ithaca. I did that for 11 years full time. Back in Argentina I had taken one year of med school, so I decided to get my associated degree at Tompkins County Community College in Biotechnology. The teachers were incredible – some of the best I have ever had. I was then accepted into the biotech program at University of Buffalo where I earned by bachelor’s degree.

What type of work do you do now?

I work now for Thermo-Fisher in the research and development group where I help design new products. Right now we are working on developing mediums for cell growth in the lab. When scientists have to growth cells in a petri dish, they have to put the cells in a substance so they grow. We make that substance for laboratories across the world, it’s very exciting.

What do you miss most about life in Argentina?

I miss my friends and family the most, of course. Argentina is a gorgeous country but people are what you miss the most. They have a different attitude toward life. People are much closer in Argentina, in terms of physical space. They touch, they stand closer. Here, they are not used to such contact. When I came here, people were bothered by how close I would stand when I talked to them. In Argentina, we hug and kiss all the time. Here, people are much more distant.

For example, you can just stop by a friend’s house without warning back home. If they are feeling bad, you can just go and take them out. Here, you need to call first. Friends are an extension of the family. In America, the term doesn’t mean quite the same thing. It is hard for people to form those stronger friendships without feeling comfortable being open and close with each other.

I also miss dancing. I used to dance every day but now it is once every week or two. Tango was always my salvation to help me adapt to this culture much faster. In tango, you have so much personal contact, you are hugging the person for the duration of the dance. It grounded me and made this foreign land seem familiar. It is hard to describe the feeling you get when you dance, but I miss it. Even though I like my job very much, after a year of working there, I haven’t touched any of my coworkers. It is a very strange feeling.

What could Americans learn from Argentineans?

We are all animals, and our lives are short and pointless. For this reason we must enjoy it. The “time is money” philosophy reduces people’s ability to enjoy their lives. They have coffee with a friend for an hour but are in a rush because they have to be somewhere else rather than enjoying the moment. Americans need to learn how to enjoy the small moments better, to live within the community and with less pressure.

Maximilian Eyle is a native of Syracuse, NY and a graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He works as a media consultant and writes each month about a variety of issues for Spanish-language papers across New York State. Maximilian has a love of Hispanic culture and learned Spanish while living in Spain where he studied and worked as an English teacher. He can be contacted at maxeyle@gmail.com.

Lady of the Arts: A Profile of Tere Paniagua

by Maximilian Eyle

La Casita Cultural Center and Punto de Contacto (Point of Contact) are two of the foremost Latino cultural institutions in Syracuse. Point of Contact is celebrating its 42nd year of showcasing Latin American contemporary art and literature, while the newer La Casita has blossomed into an active community center that provides educational opportunities, historical awareness, and cultural exhibitions. A peek behind the curtain of each reveals the tireless work of Tere Paniagua, Executive Director of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community at Syracuse University – an educator of Puerto Rican descent who has been a driving force in Syracuse’s art and culture community for over 15 years.

Tere is a slender, energetic woman with long silver hair and an ever-present smile. Before coming to Syracuse, Tere spent over 20 years working as a journalist profiling artists and literary figures in Puerto Rico and Los Angeles. She earned her degree from Syracuse University, Class of ‘82 and developed a strong connection to the city where she has now raised three children. In 2002 she started work at SU’s Latino and Latin American Studies program (LLAS) and the Department of Languages, where she began teaching and designed her own course in Spanish titled Hispanic Journalistic Practices. One of her colleagues was Point of Contact founder, Pedro Cuperman. She began helping him out and working with him during her extra time and soon fell in love with the gallery’s projects.

Today she is Point of Contact’s Executive Director, working to further the gallery’s role as a platform for showcasing visual artists and literary figures from Latin America. “People often have a preconceived notion of what Latin American art is,” Tere explains, “Point of Contact allows us to break many of those stereotypes.” One of the most important things that the gallery does is shine light on new artists, drawing attention to emerging voices in the arts community. Currently, Point of Contact is working with Abisay Puentes to plan a show for next year. The Cuban-born painter is known for his dual approach of presenting his visual work with a corresponding orchestral soundtrack.

Tere’s second project, La Casita, opened in 2011 with a distinct mission: to focus on the local community, to work with Syracuse youth, and to provide educational programs that integrate with the life of the community. La Casita presents opportunities for students that have a special interest in Syracuse’s Latino community to work as volunteers, mentors, and instructors. They exhibit visual arts, music, and dance – including monthly Argentine tango events. Tere says the goal is to choose “exhibitions that document the traditions and the life of this community.” Exhibits often include historic photos, memorabilia, and other artifacts that tell family histories among Latinos in Syracuse.

There is also an archival element to the work of La Casita. In 2017, they featured a beautiful collection of traditional musical instruments from Caribbean cultures that examines the history of that musical heritage. Before that, there was an exhibition telling the stories of Latino veterans and documenting the experiences of local and campus Latino families who had members in the military, with interviews exploring their experiences. Two years ago, La Casita entered into a partnership with the Smithsonian Institution to engage in a project that would showcase community collections. The theme of the project is “Latinos in Baseball”, presenting a view of Latino baseball culture “from the barrios to the big leagues.” The Smithsonian project now includes nearly 2 dozen partner galleries and cultural centers across the nation and will culminate in an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. in 2020 before becoming a traveling show.

“The scope of these projects would not be possible without the help and support of Syracuse University and the College of Arts & Sciences,” Tere explains. But the benefits are not one sided. While the community is nourished by the many cultural resources provided by La Casita and Point of Contact, the University is rewarded with a wealth of opportunities for student involvement, experiential learning and career advancement. Speaking to the future of Latinos in Syracuse, Tere reinforces the importance of these cultural institutions. “We ought to feel very proud of this community,” Tere says, “It is essential that we expose our youth, our students to our proud history, to our rich traditions, and to the art of our people.”

The Point of Contact Gallery is located at The Warehouse Building, 350 W Fayette St, Syracuse, NY 13202

La Casita Cultural Center is located at 109 Otisco St, Syracuse, NY 13204

Maximilian Eyle is a native of Syracuse, NY and a graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He works as a media consultant and writes each month about a variety of issues for Spanish-language papers across New York State. Maximilian has a love of Hispanic culture and learned Spanish while living in Spain where he studied and worked as an English teacher. He can be contacted at maxeyle@gmail.com.

COOKING

Sardines with Jamaican Callaloo and Green Bananas
by: Suellen Pineda, RDN, CDN

This is an inexpensive yet delicious, well-balanced, easy-to-make and nutritious meal. Sardines can be part of a healthy diet. They provide about 17 grams of protein, 23% of daily recommendation for calcium—mostly from the edible soft bones—and 10% of daily recommendation of iron. Their fat content may be slightly higher than other types of leaner fish, however, sardines are also a good source of omega 3s.

Callaloo also provides protein (about 6 grams in ½ cup), fiber, and a variety of vitamins and minerals.

Ingredients
1 18.3oz can Callaloo, liquid drained (Look for low sodium 140mg/serving OR LESS)
1 15oz. can Sardines in tomato sauce
1 small onion, julienned
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp. olive oil
½ cup pitted black olives (green olives are ok)
1 8oz. Low sodium tomato sauce
1 cup vegetable broth or water
½ tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Salt and pepper to taste
3-4 green bananas

Method
Step 1 Prepare the bananas
• Peel each banana with the help of a sharp pairing knife. Cover with water and bring to a boil with a dash of salt.
• Cook until fork tender and reserve. (To avoid dryness, do not drain the water until just before serving).

Step 2
• While bananas are cooking, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and cook the onion for about 2 minutes.
• Add garlic, olives, callaloo, and cook for an additional 2 minutes.
• Add sardines, tomato sauce, vegetable broth, granulated sugar, cumin, salt and pepper.
• Continue to cook until all ingredients are fully incorporated. (About 5 minutes). Remove from heat.

Step 3
• Drain the bananas and serve sardines mixture over. Enjoy!

Suellen is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based in the Rochester, NY area. Connect with her at suellenpinedaRDN@gmail.com or follow her on Instagram at @Suellen_Pineda.

Tangoing Across Central New York

Every Wednesday night, a group gathers at the Skybarn on Syracuse University campus. It is a mixture of students, community members, men, women, old people, young people, Americans, Europeans, Middle Easterners, Latinos, and more. What brings them together is Argentine tango, a dance that has enjoyed a strong following across Upstate New York for decades. In addition to Syracuse – Ithaca, Buffalo, Utica, and Geneva all boast their own tango communities and many dancers travel from city to city to take classes and dance with new people. These tango events include “practicas” where dancers gather informally to practice and learn from one another, and “milongas” – more formal social dances with lots of wine and food.

As I learned more about tango, I began to wonder how an Argentinean dance spread so far and attracted such a diverse array of devotees. The story begins in Buenos Aires during the late 1800s and early 1900s. As a powerful seaport, the city had lots of traffic coming in and out from Europe and other parts of the world. Tango had developed locally but carried strong influences from abroad. Many of its most influential composers have Italian names and the instrument most associated with tango – the bandoneon, is of German extraction. Buenos Aires was plagued by a lack of women compared to the number of men, and tango grew in popularity as a way of allowing men some contact with the opposite sex. Though it started in the brothels, bars, and rougher areas of Buenos Aires, the dance was spread across the world by sailors. It would catch on in Europe and eventually across the world.

At its basic level, Argentine tango is based on walking in unison with your partner in connection to the rhythm of tango music. I call it “walking while hugging”. However, as it develops for the individual dancer, it becomes an incredibly creative dance. Individual movements are strung together in an infinite number of ways in an improvised manner, so that each tango danced is a unique experience. Additionally, you can dance to the melody of the song instead of just the rhythm. Rather than memorizing figures, dancers develop the connection to their partner so that each step is communicated individually. When the connection is strong, the result is magical.

If you are interested in visiting a tango community near you, the local schedules are summarized below:

Syracuse: Wednesdays at the Skybarn on SU Campus (7:30 pm – 10:30 pm)
Ithaca: Thursdays at the Baker Portico on Cornell Campus (7:00 pm – 10:00 pm)
Utica: Sundays 6:15 to 9:15 pm at the Function Better Studio, 5094 Commercial Drive, Yorkville NY Buffalo: Every Wednesday except the last Wednesday of the month. Movement 716 at 3111 Delaware Ave, Buffalo NY (7:00 pm – 10:00 pm)

About the author – Maximilian Eyle is a native of Syracuse, NY and a graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He has experience working in the drug policy field and writes about it every month for CNY Latino. Maximilian learned Spanish while living in Spain where he studied and worked as an English teacher. He can be contacted at maxeyle@gmail.com.

Honduran Marmaón with Chicken

by: Suellen Pineda, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

 

Marmaón con pollo is a dish representative of the culinary influence that immigrants of Arabic decent have had on Central American countries, including Honduras.  Marmaón—­similar but not equivalent to couscous­—is also made with hard wheat and shaped into small pearls, although couscous is shaped into much smaller pieces and cooks even faster.

Type: main dish

Prep time: 25 minutes

Cook time: 35 minutes

Difficulty: easy

Yields: 4-6

Ingredients

2 bone-in skinless chicken breasts with rib meat OR ½ chicken (dark and white meat)

2 cups of Marmahón (pearl couscous)

1 large yellow onion, chopped

1 green bell pepper, chopped

½ red bell pepper, chopped

4 garlic cloves, peeled

1 Tbsp. olive oil

1 Tbsp. unsalted butter

2-3 carrots, peeled and diced

2 celery ribs, chopped

2 tsps. curry powder

1 bay leaf

Water

salt and pepper to taste

Method

Place chicken in a pot large enough to accommodate chicken with water without overflowing.  Add just enough cold water to cover chicken and bring to a boil.

Season with salt, ½ of green bell pepper, 2 garlic cloves (crushed), bay leaf, 1 celery rib and ½ of the chopped onion.

As soon as it starts boiling, lower the heat to medium and skim off foam that accumulates on the surface.  Cook uncovered for about 35 minutes.

Remove chicken from liquid and let cool before shredding.  Drain cooking liquid to separate solids.  Reserve liquid.

In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat, add butter.  Let foam subsides and add the rest of the onion, celery, remaining of green and red peppers and garlic.  Cook until onion turns translucent.

Add marmahón.  Stir for about 3-4 minutes.

Add carrots, shredded chicken, 3 ½ cups of the cooking liquid, curry powder. Check if it needs an extra pinch of salt.

Cover and simmer for 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Let it rest for 2-3 minutes.

Garnish with cilantro leaves.

Note: the amount of liquid needed to cook Marmahón varies depending on the brand.  Always check cooking instructions on the product label.

Suellen is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based in the Rochester, NY area.  Connect with her at suellenpinedaRDN@gmail.com or follow her on Instagram at @Suellen_Pineda